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Before Diana Kudajarova and Tse Wei Lim opened Journeyman, they had no formal restaurant experience. “My husband and I ran a supper club for two and a half years while we had full time jobs. We came to a point where we needed to quit or move,” says Kudajarova.Before Diana Kudajarova and Tse Wei Lim opened Journeyman, they had no formal restaurant experience. “My husband and I ran a supper club for two and a half years while we had full time jobs. We came to a point where we needed to quit or move,” says Kudajarova.

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make a sweet dish

Want the floral complexity, tang, and creaminess of a Ramos Gin Fizz without a Jello arm? At Baldwin Bar in suburban Woburn, Massachusetts, Bartender Vannaluck Hongtong riffs on the Ramos with his drink, I Put a Spell on You. The cocktail boldly omits egg white, cream, and soda for 1 barspoon of Greek yogurt. That aside, all the usual suspects are present: 1½ ounces Bombay Sapphire gin, ¾ ounce lemon, and 10 drops orange blossom water, plus 1 ounce of Earl Grey syrup. Hongtong wet shakes everything together (briefly) and strains the mixture into an ice-filled Collins glass. I Put a Spell on You does not promise the Ramos’ classic foamy head and has a lightly chalky mouthfeel from the yogurt, but Hongtong’s drink takes a fraction of the time and shaking effort and promises a real, delicious reward.

 

Dish

Want the floral complexity, tang, and creaminess of a Ramos Gin Fizz without a Jello arm? At Baldwin Bar in suburban Woburn, Massachusetts, Bartender Vannaluck Hongtong riffs on the Ramos with his drink, I Put a Spell on You. The cocktail boldly omits egg white, cream, and soda for 1 barspoon of Greek yogurt. That aside, all the usual suspects are present: 1½ ounces Bombay Sapphire gin, ¾ ounce lemon, and 10 drops orange blossom water, plus 1 ounce of Earl Grey syrup. Hongtong wet shakes everything together (briefly) and strains the mixture into an ice-filled Collins glass. I Put a Spell on You does not promise the Ramos’ classic foamy head and has a lightly chalky mouthfeel from the yogurt, but Hongtong’s drink takes a fraction of the time and shaking effort and promises a real, delicious reward.

 

Dish

Break the chocolate into a large heatproof bowl. Bring a pan of water to a simmer, then sit the bowl on top. The water must not touch the bottom of the bowl. Let the chocolate slowly melt, stirring now and again with a spatula. For best results, temper your chocolate (see tip).
Meanwhile, lightly grease then line a 23 x 33cm roasting tin or baking tray with parchment. Put three-quarters of the mini eggs into a food bag and bash them with a rolling pin until broken up a little.
When the chocolate is smooth, pour it into the tin. Tip the tin from side to side to let the chocolate find the corners and level out. Scatter with the smashed and whole mini eggs, followed by the freeze-dried raspberry pieces. Leave to set, then remove from the parchment and snap into shards, ready to pack in boxes or bags.

Tip
Tempering chocolate
Tempering is the process of heating then cooling chocolate to form a specific type of crystals in the cocoa butter. If we simply melt and cool shop- bought chocolate, it will quickly ‘bloom’, with dots and streaks of cocoa butter. It melts quickly when touched too. Tempered chocolate will quickly set hard and shiny, won’t bloom, and shrinks as it cools, making it easy to remove from a mould. Here’s a simple method: Break up 3/4 of the chocolate into a heatproof bowl. Melt until it is flowing and smooth. White chocolate should reach 43C, milk and dark 45C. Add the remaining chocolate, chopped into small pieces. Stir with a spatula until the pieces have melted and the thermometer shows 28C for milk and white, 30C for dark. This can take a while, so have patience and keep stirring. Use as soon as possible. If the chocolate starts to get too cold and thick as you use it, heat for just a few seconds and stir well.

It's late fall in New York, and at Matt Danzer and Ann Redding's audacious little Uncle Boons, that means the return of haw mok phukk tong. Redding learned to make the tradional dish—a curried fish custard steamed in a banana leaf—in her mother's Thai kitchen, but in a radical vegetarian mash-up, the couple substitutes sweet, seasonal kabocha squash for the fish. More than anything, it's a visual play with both orange-hued versions looking remarkably similar. But to the uninititated American diner, the dish is a silky, flavor-packed revelation.

The custard is seasoned with soybean paste (in lieu of fish sauce to keep in vegetarian), palm sugar (for its smoky sweetness), and fragrant krachai (or fingerroot, a ginger-like rhizome). The kitchen then steams the custard in a combi coven and finishes them with makrut-infused salted coconut cream, candied coriander and pumpkin seeds, and chiles. It's a salty, sweet, fiery, wholly untraditional fall knockout.

 

In a tasting menu featuring head to toe fare, pastry chefs are most often than not, exempt from participating. However, for Katie Hamilburg at 80 Thoreau outside of Boston, it's a welcome challenge that helps stretch her technical skills and creative mind. The aptly named dish is a poetic play on the slaughtered pig's name and the distilled wine.

From the pig, Hamilburg uses its fresh lard, which she carefully renders and smokes and uses to replace a portion of the fat content in her chocolate pavé. The smokiness cuts what normally may feel too decadent or rich, and creates balance. On top of the pavé is an armagnac ice cream, which literally and figuratively uplifts the idea behind the dish. Tart apricots are puréed and confit-ed which add the perfect touch of salivating tartness, while the cocoa gastrique with spiced pecans are a thoughtful reference to savory ways in which the pig's other parts could have been served.

In a feast that usually calls for primal cuts of meat and an obligatory show of a decapitated head, Hamilburg glorifies the kill with delicate prose and lyricism. It leaves both the kitchen and diners in a peaceful lullaby that is warm and full of meaning.