Sherry Vinegar for President

By

Lisa Elbert
Chef Tory Miller of Madison, Wisconsin leading a demo on cross-cultural rabbit dishes at ICC 2015
Chef Tory Miller of Madison, Wisconsin leading a demo on cross-cultural rabbit dishes at ICC 2015

“There's a lot of agriculture around Madison, Wisconsin,” said Chef Tory Miller. “Local farms actually raise rabbit for us, so we do a LOT of rabbit in my restaurants.” At his 2015 ICC demonstration "Rabbit: The Other Other White Meat," Miller took rabbit on a cross-cultural journey from Korea and France to Spain, and showed attendees how rabbit is done—break-down to garnish.

“When you adapt rabbit into your dishes and cooking style, you can pretty much flavor it however you want. It's so versatile,” he said. There was a common thread throughout the rabbit's journey in Miller's workshop: Sherry vinegar. “I use a lot of Sherry vinegar in my cooking,” he said. “Over the years, my palate has changed and evolved, but Sherry vinegar works across so many cuisines.” 

Miller brushes his Spanish-style rabbit in Sherry vinegar salmuera, a brine of Sherry vinegar, garlic, shallots, water, olive oil, salt, and pepper. The salmuera punches up the flavor and keeps the rabbit moist as it grills. “I love the simplistic nature of a lot of the food there. It always seems so simple, but as you're prepping, you realize how many steps there actually are. But then there's just three things on the plate. It's so awesome.” 

Miller is Korean, but adopted, and it was through food that he found his heritage. But no matter where he's from, where he's lived, or lives now (yes, even in America's Dairyland), he can dress his rabbit in Sherry vinegar and create a dish to represent them all. And damn, is that bunny delicious.

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